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Every project, large or small, has a problem to solve, which is how to best transmit its message. This can often be thought of in technical ways, like high quality gear, or editing. But each technical element is merely an indicator - intonation alone does not carry a piece of music, even though it’s always better to hear music in tune than not. The combined, or gestalt, of all those technical elements is a fully realized picture of the message of the project. Something “perfectly” 3-dimensional. A message in art is not a sentence. That is the message in a syllabus. The message in art is beyond succinction, that’s why we have it in our lives! I use my unique abilities with cello and cello production to help musicians and filmmakers come up with solutions for the message of their art.

 

There is power in cello. It is one of the most manipulatable instruments on the planet, with changes in color, loudness, and range all precisely performed with intention. Beyond this massive - often unwieldy - technical ability of the instrument, is the ability to bring a gestalt approach to every nuance. From a production standpoint, this means cello can double or replicate many instrument roles with just one instrument. These include pads, textures, harmonies, extended techniques, fast arpeggios, slides, of course famously gorgeous melodies etc. But embedded in ANY of these techniques is the ability to add unique shape and color. A fingerprint of the meaning of the song in every moment of sound.

 

One thing I don’t believe in is music or film that plays by too many hierarchical rules. My favorite music is not music that sacrifices form for function. My ears, as I’m sure most people’s do, like to hear a song that is sonically effective at storytelling, as well as motivically or lyrically or whatever else. The way I picture it is a bunch of overlapping bell curves which, all put together, form a perfect sphere. This might seem odd at first, but take any one musical element, say, pitch, and there is a bell curve. First the note has to sound at all (start of the curve) then it settles into its primary frequency for most of the duration of its execution (the bell part) and then it ends in some way. I believe in music that would look as “perfectly round” no matter which element you chose to look at that moment.

Dark Ambition - with Jon Gary
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Remember Me - with Craig Bachmann
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Upside - with Salomon
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Blue Jean Blues - with Space Folk
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SOLO - From the Beginning - with Space Folk
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